Archive for the ‘Project Management’ Category

How to enhance a developer’s career, skills and competencies model

int_blog_academy,  Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Start by creating an IT skills grid for each team member.

  • List the individual’s specific skillsCatalog all technical competencies and skills in key areas such as design, HTML, communications, customer service and inter-personal relationship.
  • Define maturity levels—Using a standards system such as the Carnegie Mellon Capability Maturity Model (CMM) , specify current maturity levels for each skill along a standardized spectrum.
  • Identify skills of interest—Ask the individual to specify areas of interest that coincide with what the company will require over the next one to five years.

Work with each staff member to develop an individually customized Action Plan to help them move from their current position on the IT skills grid to their desired one.

  • Establish direction—Make sure that complementary skills are developed which, when combined, represent a clear path toward responsibilities that will be more rewarding to the employee and more valuable to the firm.
  • Define key stages—Design the Action Plan as a road-map—one made up of discrete stages that provide both the individual and the company with logical touch points where progress can be assessed, achievement acknowledged and course corrections introduced.
  • Specify outcomes—Decide how the individual’s progress will be measured. When possible, identify benchmarks. Devise passing grades on standardized technical competency exams or numerical scores based on department peer reviews or internal user surveys.
  • Annualize objectives—Incorporate this information into a career plan supported by mutually agreed upon annual objectives for the employee. Conduct performance evaluations throughout the year. Provide counseling as appropriate. Update the staff member’s career plan, annual plan and objectives, and positioning on the IT skills grid. Use these elements, among others, to assess incentives and other compensation.

Key steps to being a Successful Project Manager

int_blog_academy,  Friday, February 20th, 2009

How do you maximize your chances for success? The project management steps below guide you through the process of managing any project, step by step.

1. Define the Scope
The first, and most important, step in any project is defining the scope of the project. What is it you are supposed to accomplish by managing this project? What is the project objective? Equally important is defining what is not included in the scope of your project. If you don’t get enough definition from your boss, clarify the scope yourself and send it back upstairs for confirmation.

2. Determine Available Resources
What people, equipment, and money will you have available to you to achieve the project objectives? As a project manager, you usually will not have direct control of these resources, but will have to manage them through matrix management. Find out how easy or difficult that will be to do.

3. Check the Timeline
When does the project have to be completed? As you develop your project plan you may have some flexibility in how you use time during the project, but deadlines usually are fixed. If you decide to use overtime hours to meet the schedule, you must weigh that against the limitations of your budget.

4. Assemble Your Project Team
Get the people on your team together and start a dialog. They are the technical experts. That’s why their functional supervisor assigned them to the project. Your job is to manage the team.

5. List the Big Steps
What are the major pieces of the project? If you don’t know, start by asking your team. It is a good idea to list the steps in chronological order but don’t obsess about it; you can always change the order later.

6. List the Smaller Steps
List the smaller steps in each of the larger steps. Again, it usually helps you remember all the steps if you list them in chronological order. How many levels deep you go of more and more detailed steps depends on the size and complexity of your project.

7. Develop a Preliminary Plan
Assemble all your steps into a plan. What happens first? What is the next step? Which steps can go on at the same time with different resources? Who is going to do each step? How long will it take? There are many excellent software packages available that can automate a lot of this detail for you. Ask others in similar positions what they use.

8. Create Your Baseline Plan
Get feedback on your preliminary plan from your team and from any other stakeholders. Adjust your timelines and work schedules to fit the project into the available time. Make any necessary adjustments to the preliminary plan to produce a baseline plan.

9. Request Project Adjustments
There is almost never enough time, money or talent assigned to a project. Your job is to do more with the limited resources than people expect. However, there are often limits placed on a project that are simply unrealistic. You need to make your case and present it to your boss and request these unrealistic limits be changed. Ask for the changes at the beginning of the project. Don’t wait until it’s in trouble to ask for the changes you need.

10. Work Your Plan, But Don’t Die For It
Making the plan is important, but the plan can be changed. You have a plan for driving to work every morning. If one intersection is blocked by an accident, you change your plan and go a different way. Do the same with your project plans. Change them as needed, but always keep the scope and resources in mind.

11. Monitor Your Team’s Progress
You will make little progress at the beginning of the project, but start then to monitor what everyone is doing anyway. That will make it easier to catch issues before they become problems.

12. Document Everything
Keep records. Every time you change from your baseline plan, write down what the change was and why it was necessary. Every time a new requirement is added to the project write down where the requirement came from and how the timeline or budget was adjusted because of it. You can’t remember everything, so write them down so you’ll be able to look them up at the end-of-project review and learn from them.

13. Keep Everyone Informed
Keep all the project stakeholders informed of progress all along. Let them know of your success as you complete each milestone, but also inform them of problems as soon as they come up. Also keep you team informed. If changes are being considered, tell the team about them as far ahead as you can. Make sure everyone on the team is aware of what everyone else is doing.

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